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and the uk government on following the lead of the scottish government and scottish parliament in its using equal marriage minimum pricing for alcohol and previously on the smoking ban. given the fact that unemployment is now lower in scotland than the rest of the uk, will he follow the lead of the scottish government by introducing a more shovel-ready measures for economic growth? >> i think what the honorable gentleman will find is because of the measures taken in the autumn statement, there's an extra 300 million pounds for the scottish government to spend, so if they want to spend that on shovel-ready measures they can. but i certainly am happy to say that when good policies are introduced in any party, in the united kingdom to i think we all have the opportunity to follow them. >> order. statements, the prime minister. >> here on c-span2 we will leave the british house of commons now as they move onto other legislative business. you've been watching prime minister's questions time era questions time error of life wednesdays at 7 a.m. eastern of parliament is in session. you can see thi
not to meet with us. the message about our concern, again, not just those of the united states but britain and france come we traveled there as the t-3, three permanent members of the security council who have worked together on many issues. but we did speak with the foreign minister, plus some of her colleagues. again, we raised the issue of the need to and outside support. as in previous discussions, the rwandan government strongly, vehemently denies that it is providing any assistance to the m23, and it has not taken the steps of publicly denouncing on a bilateral basis the m23. so we have raised this, and it's important that we continue to monitor this as others in the international community do on a very, very close basis. with respect to your second question about international support, or at least our bilateral support to the rwandan government, i start with what i said to congressman marino earlier, is that they utilize their international assistance, not only from us in particular, but others very, very effectively and to use it with great integrity. people get it. we are not prov
within the u.s. and the west and libya was a time which i had lived as a junior diplomat from 2004-2006 when a small group of us were sent to tripoli to basically laid the foundation for picking the embassy. i, you know, spend a lot of time in the middle east, sometimes i wonder whether i should a steady japanese like when i was in college because the degree of change ability, it's a drama continuing, but there's a certain something about the region and the people and the disparate culture which is really quite gripping and the more that you get into it the more you become passionate about it. i'm simply very passionate about libya. essentially some of the reflections that i heard, the commentary that was made to me while i was posted in libya were basically driving desire to write this book because a number of people came up to me. very surprising in different contexts, different taxi drivers, police to make lots of money as middlemen between the regime and the private sector, former mark -- former monarchy, people who have been parliamentarians' back in the 60's said, look, we un
a lot of what we read their is a discussion between u.s. regulators, foreign regulators and often concern on the harmonization between the two, and both the pro methodology use of language because many of us are starting to see a more complex world coming in where others multiple product wrapped in their and if there's a currency okay that might be exempt. there might be a package that actually has from both of you that sort of harmonization really does become important. is there a difference between the way your regulatory bodies are approaching these? >> we have worked together and harmonize on the definitions that you just mentioned about the swaps and mixed swaps and security based swaps so i think the public has a great deal of guidance and the rules but to the extent they need to come back on the package we would address it together. >> mr. cook do you have any incumbent new york city in different approaches is that cultural between the two regulatory bodies? >> i can't speak to the cftc statute but one of the reasons it drove us to the rulemaking in the context is that we l
of libya's ire -- ire veal -- irrelevance of u.s. policy. go back to the libyan's fate, one, the u.s. relations with lip ya has been, you know, u.s. has always looked at libya as something of a strange creature that we could use for certain -- as a piece, of a strategy that had to do with the region as a whole. it was never looked at -- it was never seen as an object in and of itself. could start with the relation of the soviets, the eisenhower doctrine, and the united states' desire to push back soviet influence. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid, to get itself together, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil, and the u.s. took a, well, you know, you're not really important as e just a minute, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it, and the result was that the prime minister of the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention, and that happened. the next, you know, major event was the libya's and gadhafi's successful bid to change drastically th
it is not. america is the oldest country in the modern world. because the american constitution provided us with a template for classless democracy. not the america that she did but certainly that was the ideological template around it. india is important, 1947, because india is the oldest nation and the postcolonial world. and the indian constitution similarly creates an ideological template for democracy. but with the emergence of india also emerged china, and china had a different template. again, not getting into what is right and what is wrong, but these are alternative -- how to run your nation and postcolonial society. and very interesting we received in comparison to parties, won the congress and the chinese communist party. actually became the dominant force in the post-independent state. one advocate would have to be -- because both emerge from ravaged economically driven set of needs. the congress offered soft left. the chinese offered hard left, or autocratic left. a long story, both had -- >> you said long story shorter i want to get to the short part. spent discussing it with
to be the best solution for us, the other test is a bio markers tests and that is an indication of the effect of growth hormone on the body and since those effects of last much longer than the growth hormone is actually there the window of detection is much broader and the other two tests currently in development. >> did trials include a wide range of individuals with a wide range of body types? >> yes, it did. >> as the test gone through the peer review process and what were the results of that process? >> as i mentioned the test has had four publications related to the test itself published in the peer review literature. the bio markers test has had 33 publications weighing the background for the tests and again those are in. the literature. quite a bit of research has been done over the last 15 years. >> thank you. mr. chairman, just yesterday the committee received a letter from scott blackman of the u.s. olympic committee stating, quote, given the stringent review process, the utmost confidence in the approved testing methods to detect h. g. h. and i ask unanimous consent to answer this
, but accurate thomas of abuse in the second panel will tell us the exact same thing that it's moving smoothly and we have no strong need for concerns. but which case he can make her happily. if not, the old adage of the host, paul hervey and now we hear the rest of the story. so with that, we'll start right off as we normally do from the left. from berkeley is a recognized and welcomed me to the panel and you are recognized for five minutes. >> thank you. good afternoon, chairman garrett and members the committee. my name is keith bailey. i am from barclays in that division. i appreciate the opportunity to testify on behalf of the institute of international bankers of the dodd-frank at in its impact on the market. the iab greatly appreciates the hard work done by regulators and congressional committees. we face the cftc in getting this right to operate on such a global basis. a test on a focus on continuing certainty of the type of seven regulations the effect it's having on the risk of the market of the implementation process is not on a more stable footing. they recognize the need for inter
better able to be used for teaching purposes and then we hope one day we will end up in law school perhaps with an attorney. thank you for everything you've done. the logic, the framework as follows, the first part of the book deals with the war on terrorism demand utility second power which has a debate. homegrown terrorism which is a debate. in the interrogation issue which is a debate for abrams. and been moved to an area we thought, part two, very big issue. data, technology, and privacy. broca number of debates which include third-party information issues this is a debate. national security of all other issues which is between richardson and couponing. and then we have the einstein. we thought it will be interesting to have a debate about what the new technology is moving forward with his between gen dempsey and paul rosenzweig. and then the communications system law-enforcement act. what's next, susan land out. we are starting with the framework of a week-old legal frameworks for projecting force. we will have to of those debates . to they were going to do cyber warrant atten
stability and security of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interest. and, of course, the keys to success will be innovative access agreements, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases, efficient force posture initiatives that will maximize the dollars that we are given to stand. and it also is by putting our most capable forces forward, as was her newest most advanced equipment to ensure we effectively operate with our allies and partners across a wide range of operations as we work together for peace and stability. i was asked to keep these opening remarks at little shorter than the last time, so i can get to your questions. so i'd like to finish up with a couple of thoughts. the rebalanced is based on a strategy of collaboration and cooperation. thought containment. and that the united states is a pacific power that will remain a pacific power, and we at pacom look forward to doing our part to keep asia is difficult full, peaceful and secure for decades to come. thank you. >> will take our first question writer spent admiral, thank you for meeting
the other lesson learned for us is to look beyond the tactical level of training that's provided by the department of defense to consider what ways we might also engage in terms of institutional development with the defense institutions and that's something in the last several years where we are ramping up in the department of the ability to provide advisers and other types of institutional reform engagement with various military partners to ensure that just as we are looking at strengthening of the tactical level we are also focusing on the institutional strength of these defense institutions. >> ms. dory can we afford to wait a year for planning, training, assembly of a regional force for the completion of negotiations for the successful election in some press accounts aqim is described as this point the best funded and best equipped most potentially lethal affiliate in the world and those accounts are overblown but the suggestion is we should have an area the size of texas controlled by terrorists engaged in drug trafficking and kidnappings that have had an inflow of some soph
is the negotiators are probably going to use a baseline that is different from the congressional budget office and senator warner talks about getting savings from the tax rates going up on what the americans. as i understand, it is already built into the cbo baseline. so, in terms of getting to that four to 6 trillion-dollar how much are we talking a lot in terms of real savings and in terms of tax increases, and how much are we talking about in terms of coming you know, just a redefined baseline? and then in the other question is can you give us an idea in terms of framework we are likely to see at the end of the year are we just going to see a bunch of top line number $800 billion with some sort of trigger or are we going to see the details, and if we see a bunch of top line numbers, how long does it take to get to feeling that an and drafting the legislation to get it through the congress? >> i would like to answer the second question. >> there is an old adage that says you don't learn a lot on the second kick in the shin from a mule. we've down this road of process. we have 12 fighting hig
with all designated persons connected to the iranian government. it bans trade and commodities used, it is designed to stop iran from busting sanctions by receiving payment in gold or using oil payments in local currency to buy gold. we have got to stop an effort to water down these sanctions. i say that because i remember the votes in the past, i remember our effort on the central bank. it was only because we got unanimous votes because we got so much sport that we were able to deploy those. let me add there's another portion of the amendments here that targets the regime for their human rights abuses and i think one of the areas where we have really been short, for those of you who talked to those who have been in the prisons, who have experienced the torture, seen the murder, experience the rapes, those are routine. iranian officials are involved in that activity but also in massive corruption preventing humanitarian assistance, food and medicine from reaching the iranian people, they are the beneficiaries of some of this and this new amendment would authorize the administration
2011, mr. broussard, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. that background, mr. brousard brings a broad perspective on health care issues facing our country. mr. broussard holds his undergraduate degree from texas a&m and an mba from the university of houston. were very much looking forward to your comments today. thanks for being here. [applause] >> thank you. well, thank you. i really appreciate the opportunity from each one of you. our nation is actually wrestling -- [inaudible] a large amount of debt the united states is facing. i will outline the challenge we face. i'll also show you some transforming health care is one of the ways we can solve that issue. i'll demonstrate how new approaches to integrating the delivery system and how it is already achieving some result outside of the federal government. the health care can harness simplicity, has sustainability, even if the health care system undergoes some significant transformations. first, but to take a moment and talk about ohio and cleveland and how they're
will come here to washington and ask us to help them out from their bad decisions. i hope at that time that we can show by pointing at these states and these right ideas that we know the solutions at the state level and that we also know that we can change how we think here at the federal level and make our country work a lot better. i i leave here with a lot of respect for my colleagues. i know my democrat colleagues believe with conviction their ideas. and i know my republican colleagues do too. but i hope we can look at the facts. i hope we can look at the real world. i hope we can look at what's working and set aside the politics and realize what really makes this country great and strong is when we move dollars and decisions out of washington back to people and communities and to states, that it works. not for 2% but for 100% of americans. i feel like our customers in the senate, at the heritage foundation, or wherever we go, are 100% of americans who these ideas can work for to build a better future and a stronger america. and i'm not leaving the fight. i hope to raise my game at
as well. europe and the u.s. until recently liked to think these dark times were in the past and religious violence was somewhere else, in societies more allegedly primitive, less characterized by heritage of christian values. today we have many reasons to doubt that. our situation calls urgently for critical self examination as we try to uncover the roots of ugly fears and suspicions that currently disfigure all western democracies. in april of 2011 a lot affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from march to marketplaces to shops, although the law does not mention the word women, muslim, bertha or bail it was introduced by president nicolas sarkozy and a ban on muslim veiling which according to him imprisons women and threatens french values of dignity and equality. the new law makes illegal the barca but france is the first country to enact a full ban on the burke that in public space similar restrictions of being considered all over europe and many countries in regions that adopted some type. on april 28, 2011, the chamber of representativ
are facing now a possible theory of stearate using chemical weapons. they should've been abolished five or 10 years ago if the treaty had been enforced. so it seems to me, go for abolition of these weapons with good, thorough verification. i worked with inf despite the fact that two or three years before we got it, but that would be acceptable. >> rick, your turn. >> as the chairman of the global stearate u.s.a., i have to agree with jack. i won't expound on that. you know, there was no way when i was deeply involved in the issue in the early 80s that i could've foreseen gorbachev. nor could i foreseen the treaty. the zero option when it was propounded was preposterous. i post it. so did the secretary of state. reviewed this and i guess this is the lesson. we view this is largely a challenge and an opportunity and strengthen the alliance. we saw ourselves under threat. the doublecheck decision on deployment of the missiles was part of a broader political military exercise to strengthen the alliance to deal with whatever the next challenge we would face from the soviet union. what i have to sa
four years because helping u.s. job creators export shouldn't be a partisan issue. over 100 bilateral trade agreements are being negotiated today as we speak here on the floor. the united states is a party to none of them. we are a party to one multilateral trade agreement which i support but we need to get back engaged in bilateral agreements to open markets for our products, our service providers. we have been sittingr hands on the sidelines in an increasingly global and dynamic economy. this is the first administration actually since f.d.r. not to ask for the ability to negotiate trade agreements using expedited procedures. and this is something unique, trade promotion authority in order to negotiate agreements. this administration has yet to even ask for it over the last four years. last year we finally passed the korea, panama and colombia export agreements. hopefully our bipartisan actions today to boost exports to russia will signal a new chapter, for us to engage as a congress and with the administration in a much more ambitious and proactive trade policy. i'm pleased this bip
we'd like to add indicate -- advocate the things that people sent us here to do. if we have something to say in an amendment, if we're in the minority, we'd like to have the chance to make that amendment. what a number of us are doing, we've been talking, is how can we do two simple things, how can we make it easier for the majority leader to get bills to the floor and how can we make it easier for the minority especially to be able to offer amendments? if we can do those o things, madam president, at the beginning of the year, i think the united states senate will begin to function much more effectively. it will be a better place to work. we'll get our job done in a better way. there will be less finger pointing and more results. there will be a change in behavior, which is what we really need instead of a change in rules. and it will inspire the confidence of the people of the united states about the kind of job we're doing. thank you, mr. president. i yield the floor, and i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call:
insurance companies that incentives to take care of us. >> host: john goodman, when it comes to preexisting conditions, does the government have the rule and saying you need to ensure preexisting conditions? >> guest: yes, but she don't want to join the premium below the cost of care because the insurance company isn't going to want you and is going to treat you poorly. so what we recommend is being able to ensure an advance against preexisting conditions so if you have to pay a higher premium on insurance that pays a higher premium. but also we need affordable insurance. we don't have it dandruff on the care. if you own your own insurance, take a job to job. >> host: the employer system, is it time to not be the system? >> guest: i believe in free markets. employers do what they need to do. but let's have a level playing field. once in every state make it illegal for the employer to buy for employees insurance they can take with them for the next job. we need to abolish laws, turn everything around and encourage affordable insurance. >> host: what is the argument in favor of having it divi
into the ground. >> so could you give some examples, number one, of this network that you talk about in the u.s., how it exists? >> in the u.s., for instance, after the invasion of iraq one of the major construction or reconstruction quote unquote ventures was, you know, commissions, somehow, or given somehow to various corporations that are very much in touch or close to or part of the network of, for instance, vice president dick cheney. whether it's halliburton, other companies, they ended up unfairly taking up these and they didn't do a good job at all by virtue of the result -- [inaudible]. these can networks -- another can of such network, if you would like to look at the much bigger scale, the entire seven to $800 billion bailout is a function of a very quote unquote legal state business network that operates that allows our system to bail out people that have caused the problem under legal pretense. the issue is in countries like syria. the money is much smaller, and the checks and balances that what is the media or the democratic process, and other civil society associations and power
the problems facing the u.s. economy for about an hour and 45 minutes. next on book tv. [applause] >> thanks to the fashion institute of technology. unquestionably the most in the world today. [applause] in addition to being nobel laureates i would have to say from the vantage point for the economic thinking those would be my finalists. [applause] as you know, we've written a book that pertains to the challenges and circumstance the price of an equality. on behalf of them i thank you for your patronage and. let's start with paul. paul, you talked about and this depression now. a lot of people don't believe we could end this now. but agency deutsch human beings have to take on this challenge? something that is recognizably the same kind of animal. we victimize it is the same technology still there and skills are still there. look back to the 1930's and there are a lot of people making the argument that there were no easy answers and you could quickly get out of this [inaudible] and the 1939 and these are fundamental problems and if we want to make progress to cut unemployment benefits and thi
word for it. two-thirds of the american public agrees with us but you don't need to take their word for it, either. just listen to the voices within speaker boehner's own party. there we go. a kent conrad i am not in terms of my facility with charts. it's clear that speaker boehner has needed cover from his right flank before he could agree to any deal on taxes with the president. the speaker didn't have it before, but he sure has it now. when "the wall street journal" editorial page says that decoupling would not go against conservatives' antitax principles, that gives a whole lot of cover to the speaker. when grover norquist refuses to declare whether decoupling would violate his group's pledge, that, too, gives a whole lot of cover to the speaker. and when more and more rank-and-file republicans come out publicly every day in favor of passing the senate bill, that, too, gives cover to the speaker. you really have to absolute cram tom cole. he was the first one on the other side to dare speak the truth about what should be done on taxes and he's been on tv almost every day making
and hawaii. that's he humility he showed his entire life. there was no staff there just the two of us. we talked for an hour. i would always remember -- having passed away yesterday, it will be imbedded in my mind. as we left, we both thought about fact we had not been able to sit down and talk like that enough. he professed at that time -- his words -- how lucky he has been his whole life. he said i got at emphysema now. i said, not from smoking. he said, i learn to smoke in the war as a boy. he smoked from 1944 to 1967. he told me he had lung cancer. but they were wrong. they took part of his lung out. he talked about how lucky he had been with surviving what he fought with lung can certification but how lucky he had been his while life, for example, the war. i'm sure people would not reflect on his massive injuries as being lucky. butth but he considered he was lucky to have lived. he had been called upon with three other people, three other soldiers, to cross a river in the dark of night, to find out what was going on, on the other side of the river, and he and his three companions, i
. this is about ten minutes. >> good evening, welcome and thank you for joining us. my name is richard fontaine. i'm the president for the center of new american security. it's a pleasure to welcome you all here to celebrate the publication of robert kaplan's new book the reason geography what they tell us about the coming conflict in the battle against the state. i've heard it said before that you all very great author by reading his books not by buying them -- they will be sold on the stage in this room back here. bald kaplan's work is known no doubt why this audience. he's been a senior fellow and in march of 2008 a foreign correspondent for the atlantic for about a quarter of a century and is currently the chief geopolitical analyst. i first became acquainted with his writing during his book with traces of history of the tight midwesterners living and working in the middle east. and since that book, the very titles of his work goes to the coming anarchy have provoked the debate. the recent book of american power has become acquired reading by those interested in the strategic competition in th
-handed pitch, a college baseball player and two of her granddaughters that worked for me as a page, for us as a page, rebecca and holly. when she's not at the desk -- and she spends long hours there -- mr. president, i don't go home early. i could call, she would be there, 9:00, 10:00 at night and that is no exaggeration. but she's not at that desk, janice was usually in georgia or north carolina with her children or grandchildren. now, she has probably been really political but i think she's gotten a little more political working for me. she's made sure each of her grandchildren makes sure they understand the importance of their political voice. during the recent election she called those eligible to vote to make sure they'd voted. and i didn't press very hard but she may have urged them how they should vote. while janice's accomplishments deserve recognition, it is janice herself who will be missed so dearly. she has served not only as a deeply trusted and committed assistant to me, but as a mentor to many who have worked with her. i know i'm not the only one who will note her be absence
is used to guide us, but a waste of money. the government should be involved in the. unfortunately, there are times when people evaluate investments that help our poorest children, the people in the toughest, most disadvantaged neighborhoods, some of our most intractable problems even with, for example, young people rescued from trafficking. these are very, very difficult problems. and we should evaluate and see what works. but we should also insist again there's not a double standard, so that if an evaluation, single evaluation or even a couple of evaluations somehow show that a particular strategy is not worth well, that is a motivation to do things better and smarter, not an excuse or reason to say government has no business being involved in that endeavor. so i think we need to be more change, accountability, evaluation, but not a tougher, higher double standard just when it comes to young people from the most disadvantaged and troubled environment. so there is so much to talk about in the innovation area. let me just mention a few things that we are focused on and then we can
's forum is special for those who work at the presidential library and use the and it is a testimony to the hard work and dedication for those employs to work hard to preserve the nation's history and of president kennedy. this secret recordings of jfk which is now on sale sale, would not have been impossible if not for the incredible skills, talent, professional ism, dedication of our library staff in the. government employees. one person in particular rely to a knowledge its which is then archivist of these white house recording as the archivist who knows more about these taped conversations and any of the american. please join us to acknowledge all of our colleagues work here at the kennedy library. [applause] and we have a wonderful panel with us tonight. joining us is presidential historian, ted widmer has selected the most compelling and important recordings then wrote annotations to put them into context. also ellen fitzpatrick professor of history at the university of new hampshire. also frequent contributor to our forum. tom putnam the outstanding director to bring energy to
should do in the northeast so that those airports today could really be used for longer distance travel. and that we use those that made the most sense which was rail in those corridors. that would garner us our expectation is pretty close to $5 billion in revenue a year, with about a billion plus or minus coming out of that in terms of profit. >> so you cannot do a direct correlation between california's high-speed rail and northeast corridor? they are two completely -- >> not here. excuse me. i don't know if your question is done. we can't, ma i can't draw that conclusion here because you don't have the right data sets. we may have some folks that have an analysis come and i can look at the and get you an answer back spent perfect. thank you. mr. hanna. >> thank you, chairman. hi, how are you. nice to have you here. advisory commission, you're in the process of developing several other reports analyzing the pressure that would be taken off, projected pressure off of airlines, off of roads and what that means to the northeast will that report be done and what we we be able to get out o
, cultural, and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our lewis lemon auditorium. we, of course, welcome those who joins honor heritage.org website on all of these. would ask everyone here in house if you'd be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they are turned off. thank you, louis. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that. we will post the program on a website within 24 hours for your future reference, and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, doctor larry schweikart is a native arizonan turkey on this bachelor and masters degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from university of california, santa barbara. throughout his high school and college, however, he spent most of his time playing drums in a variety of dance. as a rock, he was part of several groups, one of which opened for steppenwolf, among other performers for those old enough
out there i was telling you about flex c13 amount which is using it for great. do not forget you $20 off instantly for plank and approval of your credit carter hsn mastercard. we are going to check in quickly with our hsn spotlight. >>host: welt champion serena williams is returning tomorrow so tune in and check out her signature3 line tomorrow at hsn. to stay with us right now and all of you shoppers we have a great gift for all of those your list that you know what to get 4. it is call this one pencam with the video camera check it out after the commercial. [commercial] [reading] [♪ music ♪] >>host: well, i want to remind everybodykindle fire tablet we are about to cross 10,000 of mark beautiful and amazing tablets soul today. this is a third of our quantity sold today for the entire day and you can take home for under $40 with a credit3 of blacks payments and they do so much for your orders will process your order is as we can. we have lots of new customers to 9 and that's why we a little bit6 c13 the while you are all waiting patiently i want to discuss up fabulous idea.
, mobile banking. a whole a ray of services that we can now deliver because we are connected using this frontier technology. and that is such a powerful, powerful thing. it will have legs for the next 20 years, not to mention everything else that my friend talks about in his book on abundance, but it creates so many possibilities. >> who is the it coming prosperity written for? >> well, you know, it's written for the folks watching the show. and it's written for general audience in the united states but globally. i start in the u.s., i and in the u.s.. i feel as though the story is particularly needed in the united states. i don't believe that people in pakistan or china need to hear this because the seat. even in pakistan has really struggled with so much potential. i think it is the next greatest store, the next global opportunity and the resources we wouldn't tell people that because they would be investing heavily and the dividends with other people but it's just on the cusp of happening. really exciting. and so, it's frequent in this country. and it's for anybody that believes
.t.o. who have pntr with russia. pntr will give u.s. farmers, ranchers, businesses and workers new opportunities in russia and new jobs here at home. our competitors in china and canada and europe are not taking advantage of these opportunities because they have pntr with russia, they already have it. we are the only w.t.o. member missing out on these opportunities. if we now pass pntr, we can level the playing field and compete, and if we compete we will win. we sell more beef, we sell more aircraft, we will sell more trademarks, we will sell more medical equipment and our banks and insurance companies will grow. pntr will give our knowledge industries greater protections for their intellectual property and our farmers will have new tools to fight unscientific trade barriers. if we pass pntr, american exports to russia are expected to double in five years. this bill has strong enforcement provisions to help ensure that american farmers, ranchers, businesses and exporters get the full benefit of pntr. and this bill has strong human rights provisions. senator cardin's magnitsky act
negotiations. this is about a half an hour. [inaudible conversations] >> morning. thank you all for joining us this morning. i'm maya macguineas, i am working with the campaign to fix the debt, and i'm the president for the committee for a responsible federal budget, and i'm really excited to join a phenomenal panel that we have with us today to help the campaign fix the debt which is, um, a large, nonpartisan coalition that is focused on helping members of congress come together to put in place a comprehensive debt deal. so i'm very delighted that today what we have is a diverse and very experienced, um, group of panelists to talk about two major topics; tax reform and health care reform. all in the context of how are we going to work together to put in place a plan that would be able to tackle the nation's fiscal challenges. we will hear numerous different opinions, we will hear plenty of disagreement, and i hope we'll hear a lot of ideas about how to generate different, um, useful reforms to the budget that can help get a big deal put in place. and none of us should forget that what's going
impression on a great many people around the world, and especially on the 100 of us who serve here. he commanded our respect in a remarkable way. part of it was because of his service in the war. he and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for
take very seriously. i hope i don't finish this. this term, this year, my life to my being useful. i want to be useful. on my tombstone, he was useful. live the long time. i want to be useful. it i don't want just to say the words, i want to make a difference. >> you already are. i think you on behalf of not only a library of congress and the children's book council and every child, but on behalf of the audience and for our country , the wonderful job your doing. walter dean myers a round of applause. [applause] >> thank you. >> we continue our coverage of the international summit of the book with the panel tell the role of cultural institutions and foster in the future of the book. this is about 50 minutes. >> we are coming to the second session of our day which would be a panel discussion on the role of cultural ostentations and posturing and the future of the book. i will turn to the panel's moderator to introduce the panelists once we are all on stage. sir harold is a distinguished feature in publishing in journalism. i'm sure you've heard of him. president and publisher of rando
would like to thank hanna rosin, anita hill, thank you for joining us. .. now from freedom fest the annual libertarian conference held in las vegas. booktv sits down with peter, ceo and chief global strategist at the pacific capital incorporated and argues that his book the crash that we replaced the housing bubble with a government inflated a bubble that will eventually top and caused another economic collapse. this is about 25 minutes. >> now joining us on booktv is peter schiff, he is the author of the real crash, america's coming bankruptcy. how to save yourself and your country. here is the cover of the book published by st. martin's press. what do you think when you talk about a government goebel? >> let's go back. we had two big bubbles, we had the stock market bubble because initially the chief money supplied to the economy by the fed and the stock market has had a lot of the crazy stock is replaced by a larger bubble in the real estate in which we expanded this economy based on all of the false rules while people were spending money that they don't have come in and we h
administration. in our opinion, government data must be published and must be publishing an useful that means it has to be standardized, machine-readable and up until now, we haven't done a very good job with that. does someone have a phone? up until now we haven't done a good job with the publication. what is our view of what the obama administration has accomplished in his first four years? has the administration made strides towards publishing the government data? yes, absolutely. has the administration published the most valuable government data? now. the data from the core of government, the information that staff members at executive branch agencies reliant to make their decision has not been published. our coalition think says government in five categories. the transparency community we spend time categorizing beautiful policy categorization, so i won't spend too much time on this. broadly speaking the outside but it's usually talk about. spending, management and performance, regulation, legislation and judicial documents. in each case, certain data is at the core of government, the me
time really being called out as a problem. problem. >> dysfunction and u.s. health care industry. dr. marty makary on what hospitals won't tell you. his latest is an accountable. >> senate finance committee chair max baucus left capitol hill earlier this week to give his thoughts on what's called the fiscal cliff and negotiations that are currently underway. he spoke at an event hosted by campaign to fix the debt, a group cofounded by alan simpson and erskine bowles, the former coaches of the national commission on fiscal responsibility and reform. he spoke for about 15 minutes. >> welcome back, everybody. >> thank you. it was a traffic panel on health care. now we are really going to have a special guest. chairman baucus who is the chairman of the senate finance committee, and we will talk both about the budget negotiations that are going on now and the fiscal cliff, but what's really important is that both senator baucus and his counterpart in the house, chairman camp work together i believe on developing ideas for tax reform will be some of the lead folks who are shepherding whate
" that sprung from the awful doldrums of the u.s. economy under jimmy carter apply stronger, more strongly today. >> house so click >> obama is the same kind of antibusiness president and insight president. same kind of managerial, interfering, strangling, surprising president jimmy carter was. >> you writing here about president obama. i want to get to the right page so i can quote it correctly, sir. you write under the obama administration that the u.s. had a morbid subversion of the infrastructures of its economy. the public sector has become a manipulative forest, aggressively intervening in the venture and financial sectors with guarantees and subventions that attract talent and debunking. >> the worst of this is the korean cast of the obama administration. the epa now has gained control over everything. see so to have been deemed a pollution, dangerous to the environment in co2 is of course that these plans. they attempt to surprise or two epitomize the anti-nature, enterprise spirit of this administration. the reason we need another supply-side revival of the same kind we had under ronald
he saw the pentagon's estimate, he wrote in the margin, i doubt it, it took us three months just to take sicily. when the spending requests came in, he said, i know the boys at the pentagon. he believed real national security was from a sound economy. he was a deficit hawk, boy, we could use him today, who controlled government spending and taxes. the famous speech warning against the industrial complex was at the end of the presidency, but worked on it all along behind the scenes. heaven help us he liked to say when we get a president who knows less about the military than i do. it was not about the economy or saving money. in the berlin crisis and earlier crisis with korea and vietnam in 1953 over the strait in 1954-55 and 1958 in the suez crisis in 1956, he was planning a bigger gain for higher stakes. west point cadet and young army officer, ike was a great poker player, and, indeed, so good, he had to give it up. he was taking too much money from the fellow officers hurting his career. he switched to bridge, but he never forgot how to bluff. the soviets, he bluffed with nucl
joins us here on the red carpet. this is your story. is that correct? >> it's primarily my story but it's also the story of my family. i go back one generation more and discuss my grandmother's mythology, how she came over to america, and how ultimately her coming across from mexico into america, that sort of spawned this fantastic first generation american story. >> mr. martinez, you were raised in brownsville, texas, right on the border, what was it like during your childhood? >> back then i experienced it as being racially polarized, in a more economic sort of striation, and was very agriculturally based. my parents ran a trucking business that sort of -- basically farm laborers, so kind of a conflicted experience because we would go to school and pretend like we were wealthier than we were, and entirely different, the people who we really are or were, and then we would go home and it was a completely untraditional lifestyle as farm laborers, my brother and myself. my sisters had a different experience. ultimately that was what we knew and what we understood about our environment. >>
facebook page, posted six status ad updates, and he also had friends post things like on the wall,us like, got her in the bushes,frst telling where the guys were, and just like a big budget movie,teh theer cops break in, shootout, a goes to the hospital, the hostage is fine, but now theyakc are tryinomg to figure out whetr they can prosecute people fromes telling -- who told him wherebua the reswat team members were. you know, facebook is addictiveo a billion people on facebookw, making it the third largest nation in the world after india bo and okchina. th has cease and desist citizens, -- it has citizens, its ownits ow approaches, a and people are drawn to it like any new nation because of the sense of freedom. you could be an ordinary person, a scientist in a crowd sources project or could be a journalis reporting on what's going on in the world or if you're starting a band, you can, you know, get that with fans.hrough you can use facebook, twitter, youtube, and, you know, tolea topple a government. gove it's harder to put down aardto revolution occurring over the web than kill a chari
as difficult as one. we are sorry jeanne could be with us but we're fortunate to have represented schwarz with as representing a dish in philadelphia, and urban philadelphia, vice ranking democratic member on the committee on the ways and means committee. i want to have a conversation, that reflects kind of the dual nature of the to do list that the public can send it in the pulpit on the one hand when you ask them the most immediate challenge in washington today, with the most wanted ashington to do, they to talk about deficit or the debt, getting the fiscal house in order. but that is not the full extent. right behind that is education, retirement, good paying jobs with very different by the way, talk about priorities along partisan and racial lines. let's start with where we are and where the public not surprisingly is on the question of solving the immediate fiscal cliff decision. how would you describe your feeling that there will be some kind of accommodation deals these on the tax or the spending side, or both? >> first of all, good morning. and just, i'm not gene sperling. but i'm
that is still with us. the volcker rule label was announced to the press by obama january 2010, paul volcker by their role. -- by the president. he heard his name and thought what is that? i think the phrase in the book describing paul volcker is the man who could find fault with the mona lisa. [laughter] he made a living saying no. goldberg 1970s one. inflation 1979. speculation 2010. the underlying story line is trust which is the title of the last chapter of the book you can go there and skip the stories obama appointed him chairman of the advisory board the former president of italy wrote paul volcker a letter that still sits in a coma frame on his desk that says we trust you. and i show how he earned the trust and to follow-up with the lessons he learned about trust and his father senior 1930 through 1950 had a quotation from george washington hanging in a frame behind his desk in a letter he wrote to his officers at the time it said do not suffer your good nature to say yes and you ought to say no. remember it is not a private cause to be injured urban if it did buy your car is" he has
that told the story. the war blur that richard nixon used to trap him in the cross-examination, and these things, they live in a mythological memory. it was in the "new york times" three weeks ago or so in a box, you know, a-11, a war blur appeared in new york city in manhattan, and times photographed it, making the reference to this work we're going to talk about today, and then, i think, a classic status was enhanced by the seemingly never ending decades of controversy in which the defenders tried to make slanders of the authors of witness stick. today, i want to introduce the three panelists. this is an amazingly powerful group we have here. all at once. leave it to them. they will take it over. each, i hope, making remarks ten minute, and we'll open it up for further discussion. elliot a -- abrams had a remarkable strings of enormous importance. i remember him going back to the early reagan years. he began my knowledge with human rights, and that was really something, the jimmy carter invention of human rights, and in charge of latin american affairs, positions
about some of the problems in the persian gulf region because that's a vital interest to us. the straits of hormuz, persian gulf, or the swiss canal are blocked in any way they could have devastating impact on the united states because we still get a large part of our energy from the region. i traveled to azerbaijan an armenian in early september. and i also stopped in georgia and met with the president. when i talked to these leaders, iran was one of the things that came up at the very beginning, because they'll feel the influence and the aggressive attitude underneath cover so to speak of iran. in particular, i think azerbaijan feels a great deal of concern, and when i talked to the president, members of parliament and others, it was readily apparent to me that they thought that there ought to be closer ties between azerbaijan and the united states, and georgia, and hopefully armenia. because iran is really trying to destabilize or undermine those governments are we believe that is their long-term goal. iran has been involved in terrorism as we know for some time. it's partly unique in
was the u.s. attorney, and it was sort of this crazy world wind of six weeks from when he had that conversation with me when i was actually confirmed and started serving as the special inspector general. >> was the date that you started? >> december 15th, 2008. >> what are your politics? nominated by the bush administration essentially, but what are your politics? >> i have been a lifelong democrat. since i was old enough to vote, i have always been a registered democrat. it is kind of funny. when the u.s. attorney approached me and asked if i was interested that john and i was sort of going through different excuses why i did not want to go to washington. very happy with being a prosecutor. the only job i ever won it. was getting married, but finally when all those arguments that failed i sort of said in a very dramatic way, by the way, you know that i am, in fact, a registered democrat. it kind of went die and that that i have the killer. and i entreated to barack obama just two weeks ago to his campaign. but it was not a political appointment, it was a merit appointment. th
. forbes discusses his book, "freedom manifesto," a follow-up to his book "how capitalism will save us." >> now joining us on booktv is magazine publisher, politician and frequent author, steve forbes, whose newest book is coming out in august of 2012 and it's called "freedom manifesto: why free markets are moral and big government isn't." we are at freedom fest in las vegas, where mr. forbes is speaking. mr. forbes, why is that free markets are moreover, but that government isn't. with an example of that? >> remake the emphasis of big government. going back to it james madison defined. but in terms of big government not being moral, it is the opposite of what it purports to do and creates an environment we have less ability to get ahead increased dependency and not a sense of independence. it plessis crony capitalism, which hurts oil entrepreneurship and creativity. all the things the government says it does hopes the poor to make sure the markets: the right direction. they do the opposite. their short-term oriented, writes to the next election. they have their own agenda. they don't
the audience all of us have chapters in our lives, milestones. my important -- my most important chapter, he said, was a battle creek chapter. this is where i learned what democracy was all about. wherei learned what america wasl about. -- where i learned what america was all about. to impart any lessons about america on dan inouye would have been an honor but we may have taught him pales in comparison to what he tots. a few years ago danny told an audience that our greatness as a nation lies in part in our willingness to recognize the flaws in our past, including our treatment of japanese-americans, and our determination in whatever limited way we could to make amends. dan inouye served his country because of his dream of what we could be, a nation unbound by our all-too-human failings. he believed to his core that we are able to shed old prejudices and that our nation, de despiter flaws, shines with such bright promise that we can inspire remarkable service and sacrifice. a nation so great that those we treat with disdain or even hatred can respond with love that knows no limit. love is po
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